Image

#Grexit in a bottle, Yay… “Zum Wohl”, such a #moodhack!

Grexit in a Bottle? Oh...right on time... Zum Wohl! Is it for Greeks?

#Grexit in a bottle, Yay… “Zum Wohl”, such a #moodhack!.

Image

Berlin’s DIW president: There will be a political solution (for Greece) at the highest level ~ HellasFrappe

Marcel Fratzscher, president of Berlin's DIW, one of the leading economic research institutes and think tanks in Europe,

Marcel Fratzscher, president of Berlin’s DIW, one of the leading economic research institutes and think tanks in Europe,

Berlin’s DIW president: There will be a political solution (for Greece) at the highest level ~ HellasFrappe.

     “Our proposal is to link the payment of the loans’ interest rates with the growth of the Greek economy. If there is no growth, as is the case right now, Greece will not pay interest rates.
“I am neither a friend nor an opponent of Mr. Varoufakis. I am a friend of the good ideas that improve the situation and that is why I find the proposal correct because the Greek government assumes greater responsibility, the burden of Greece’s debt alleviates and is ensured that at some point in the distant future, when Greece recovers then it will be able to service its debt and interest, while the Greek people will be able to afford the burden of debt. I think that this is a good compromise,” he noted.

Moreover, he expressed the view that there will be a new haircut of the Greek debt. “Even if the issue of a haircut is considered a taboo at the moment in Europe and Germany, I am deeply convinced that there will be another cut. There is no alternative, if not immediately, probably later, when we find that the debt burden is simply too big. A part of the 240 billion euros was used to repay debt and interest rates. Yes, one can say that it did not remain in Greece … I do not know the exact figures, but certainly more than half the debt has been paid to lenders.”

He also estimated that the new government in Greece is an opportunity for a new start. Greece needs a political jolt, a political renewal. Nevertheless, I regret that it did not make good use of this chance … the Greek government rightly argues that we must deal with social injustices, to see how people will ensure minimum living conditions. Its failure is that it has not given a clear message that it wants to renew the country economically and politically. I

Image

USA stoped talking, said German sources, when asked by Schaule to pay 50blns for #Greece….

While President Barack Obama was exressing  his personal determination for the Greek euro crisis to be solved, on his talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel  in Bavaria, German sources, as Greek media announced,  leaked the telephone conversation between the Finance Ministers, Wolfganng Schauble and Jack Lew, were the US Finance Minister appeared as “comporomising” with the German to Greece demanding stance , when …”he heard the bill”
As  the correspondent of Mega channel in Berlin revealed, the Mega reported, the dialogue of the two men, according to German sources was as follows:

Jack Lew: Greece has to be supported
Schäuble: Why not let YOU ( the US)  pay 50 bln euros to be saved!
Jack Lew

On this point , of Ja ck Lews not-a-word for an answer, the German sources, the greek report said,  have explained that
    
      “When Money quest  comes at the table, Washington always sets back …”.
“Have you heard a more silencing asnwer than that, what do you say ?”  The ex minister of Health Adonis Georgiadis wrote immediately on his social media  twitter account

11128333_955848017788751_1014432244297891026_n  Άδωνις Γεωργιάδης

16 hrs  Ο απίστευτος διάλογος Σόιμπλε-Λιού για την Ελλάδα – http://t.co/3XccUF81cq αποστομωτική απάντηση Σόιμπλε ή όχι τί λέτε;

On the same concept with the Lew-Schauble leaked dialog, also President Barack Obama was presented on Sunday, June 7, by the Greek media
to be “compromising to Germany’s strict demands for Greece”, on his talks with Merkel in Bavaria, due to this final point: the money asked from the US to be paid for the rescue of Greece
 White House spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters on Sunday that President Obama and Chancellor Merkel discussed Greece in their bilateral meeting ahead of the G7 summit .
 As the White House spokesman said the two leaders agreed that
Greece must reform and return to sustainable long-term growth, with Obama hopeful Athens and its partners can chart that course without causing volatility in financial markets, the spokesman added.

(which is actually what Greece has expressed is its intetnion to be.)

But the Obama-Merckel talk was not the only stressful “frontier” Greece had to face during last weekend

 In a day of secluded talks in the Alpine resort of Schloss Elmau, the biggest drama was provided by a verbal attack on the Greek prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, by the European commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker, the Guardian wrote

President Obama was not the only one, (and not for his first time), that tried to bridge the differences of the two sides on Greek crisis.

Recently,  World’s Top Economists  and Educators by their full scientific credibility -worldwide- and expertise, sent their Appeal to Europe, which, as it was made known, was asking:

“In the Final Hour, a Plea for Economic Sanity and Humanity”

An impressive list of some of the world’s top economists and professors, even a Nobel Laureate included in the list, penned a letter to the Financial Times asking for economic sanity” and “humanity” from Europe, calling the programs the Eurozone is imposing on Greece “demonstrably failed.”

The complete text of the letter follows:

The future of the EU is at stake in the negotiations between Greece and its creditor institutions, now close to a climax. To avoid failure, concessions will be needed from both sides. From the EU, forbearance and finance to promote structural reform and economic recovery, and to preserve the integrity of the Eurozone. From Greece, credible commitment to show that, while it is against austerity, it is in favour of reform and wants to play a positive role in the EU.

In a letter to the FT in January, several of us said: “We believe it is important to distinguish austerity from reforms; to condemn austerity does not entail being anti-reform.” Six months on, we are dismayed that austerity is undermining Syriza’s key reforms, on which EU leaders should surely have been collaborating with the Greek government: most notably to overcome tax evasion and corruption. Austerity drastically reduces revenue from tax reform, and restricts the space for change to make public administration accountable and socially efficient. And the constant concessions required by the government mean that Syriza is in danger of losing political support and thus its ability to carry out a reform programme that will bring Greece out of the crisis. It is wrong to ask Greece to commit itself to an old programme that has demonstrably failed, been rejected by Greek voters, and which large numbers of economists (including ourselves) believe was misguided from the start.

Clearly a revised, longer-term agreement with the creditor institutions is necessary: otherwise default is inevitable, imposing great risks on the economies of Europe and the world, and even for the European project that the eurozone was supposed to strengthen.

Syriza is the only hope for legitimacy in Greece. Failure to reach a compromise would undermine democracy in and result in much more radical and dysfunctional challenges, fundamentally hostile to the EU.

Consider, on the other hand, a rapid move to a positive programme for recovery in Greece (and in the EU as a whole), using the massive financial strength of the Eurozone to promote investment, rescuing young Europeans from mass unemployment with measures that would increase employment today and growth in the future. This could both transform the economic performance of the EU and make it once more a source of pride for European citizens.

“How Greece is treated will send a message to all its eurozone partners. Like the Marshall plan, let it be one of hope not despair.”

Prof Joseph Stiglitz
Columbia University; Nobel Prize winner of Economics

Prof Thomas Piketty
Paris School of Economics

Massimo D’Alema
Former prime minister of Italy; president of FEPS (Foundation of European Progressive Studies)

Prof Stephany Griffith-Jones
IPD Columbia University

Prof Mary Kaldor
London School of Economics

Hilary Wainwright
Transnational Institute, Amsterdam

Prof Marcus Miller
Warwick University

Prof John Grahl
Middlesex University, London

Michael Burke
Economists Against Austerity

Prof Panicos Demetriadis
University of Leicester

Prof Trevor Evans
Berlin School of Economics and Law

Prof Jamie Galbraith
Dept of Government, University of Texas

Prof Gustav A Horn
Macroeconomic Policy Institute (IMK)

Prof Andras Inotai
Emeritus and former Director, Institute for World Economics, Budapest

Sir Richard Jolly
Honorary Professor, IDS, Sussex University

Prof Inge Kaul
Adjunct professor, Hertie School of Governance, Berlin

Neil MacKinnon
VTB Capital

Prof Jacques Mazier
University of Paris

Dr Robin Murray
London School of Economics

Prof Jose Antonio Ocampo
Columbia University

Prof Dominique Plihon
University of Paris

Avinash Persaud
Peterson Institute for International Economics

Prof Mario Pianta
University of Urbino

Helmut Reisen
Shifting Wealth Consultancy

Dr Ernst Stetter
Secretary General, FEPS (Foundation fro European Progressive Studies)

Prof Simon Wren-Lewis
Merton College Oxford

“They believed that by cutting wages and accepting other austerity measures, Greek exports would increase and the economy would quickly return to growth,” Stiglitz said last week. “They also believed that the first restructuring would lead to debt sustainability. The troika’s forecasts have been wrong.”

The current proposals repeat the same mistake,

the Guardian article on June 7 underlined

Tsipras and his finance minister, Yanis Varoufakis, may specialise in needling their creditors, but the troika also need to take into account the fact that Syriza has formed a legitimate, democratically elected government and cannot be told that its electoral programme is irrelevant.

So Lagarde and European commission president Jean-Claude Juncker must be the ones to table further compromises.

Neither was in charge when the first Greek bailout set all sides on the current disastrous path, the gurdian underlined, concluding that

They should explain to Ireland and Portugal, also suffering austerity, that Greece is too weak to survive more bloodletting.

G7

Image

Proceedure to accelerate, solution for #Greece to be viable and longterm, Holland- Merkel promised to contribute

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande held “friendly and constructive” talks with Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras that focussed on Athens’ completing its current bailout, a German government spokesman said on Friday, May 21, the Reuters reported,

while the NYT wrote  that German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President François Hollande have said during the meeting with Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, that they would personally help if needed to push for a speedy solution to Greece’s financing woes, reports that match, here in Greece, to the Greek political reporters’ information from PM’s office sources from Riga.

The meeting of the three lasted two hours and took place after the dinner Thursday night during an EU summit in Riga, and agreed that Athens should continue its talks with its creditor institutions, while the three leaders also agreed to keep in close contact with each other, Reuters said

According “to a senior Greek government official”, reported word-to-word the NYT. short after the meeting,

“[Ms.] Merkel and Mr. Hollande said they would personally contribute toward the direction of a viable, long-term solution for Greece and accelerate the procedure”

The trilateral meeting between Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French president Francois Hollande on the sidelines of the EU’s 4th Eastern Partnership Summit in Riga concluded late on Thursday, around  midnight
The meeting was also attended by State Minister Nikos Pappas and Alternate Minister for International Economic Relations Euclid Tsakalotos

Tomorrow President Juncker will meet with Alexis Tsipras, Friday 22.5 at 14.30 (local time), as it is also announced.

Based on the progress made thus far in the negotiations between Greek authorities and the institutions representing the creditors (European Central Bank, European Commission and International Monetary Fund), the two sides could be ready for an agreement by the end of the month, Greek government sources said in Riga, the ANA-MPA reported Thursday evening. Of course, the poisonous “news production” of international sources, could not be missing these hours, as well today.

MT Gov is optimistic about an agrmnt on . But what I am learning frm , Berlin & DC are quite different

Nikos Filis

Nikos Filis

Greece is outside Eurozone , due to the Memorandum

“What is very important is that Chancellor Merkel and President Hollande, shoed today that, indeed, they are interested in a longterm solution for Greece, commented N.Filis, Parliamentary Representative of governing SYRIZA Party, live on air, as soon correspondents reported the news on Greek tv after the meeting

” Longterm means Growth and Depth”

he emphasized, and explained to Emilios Liatsos who was interviewing him ,why these are such critical moments, not only for Greece’s present and future, but also for a viable future of  Democratic Europe, itself.

\’What this government achieved so far, is the fact the Story Greece is now discussed on the table of the top European leaders, on top political level, that really never happend before, since the Memorandum.

“It is a political decision, the survival of Greece,” Nikos Filis undelined, “as it had been  Greece’s accession to the European Community back in 1980 by Konstantine Karamanlis, Greece’s accession to the Economic Monetary Union in 2002 (even with biased data, Nikos Filis said, still, it was a political decision by Kostas Simitis), the same happens now, it is a political decision of the EU leaders to allow the re-accession of Greece”.

The Parliamentary Representative of Tsipras Party concluded his comments with  a so shocking, -though, already widely realized in Greece-, fact:

”  Greece is actually outside Eurozone , due to the Memorandum”

“Our common European future could merely be based on solidarity, said Tsipras in Berlin, naming War reparations a primarily moral issue.

CAzi7DHWAAAxoGMGreece’s leftwing prime minister Alexis Tsipras stood beside German leader Angela Merkel and demanded war reparations over Nazi atrocities in Greece on Monday night, even as the two leaders sought to bury the hatchet following weeks of worsening friction and mud-slinging, wrote the Guardian minutes after the Press Conference of the two leaders in Berlin .

It is the first time  a Greek Prime Minister sets the issue of Germany’s debt and reparations to Greece, as a common part of the two countries’ and Europe’s past and history, which has been paid by “blood”, Tsipras underlined. Looking to the future of United Europe,  which Angela Merkel has emphatically mentioned during the press conference, Tsipras said that it could not, but be based on solidarity.

“It’s not a material matter, it’s a moral issue,” said Tsipras, unusually insisting on raising the “shadows of the past” at the heart of German power in the gleaming new chancellery in Berlin. It is believed to be the first time a foreign leader had gone to the capital of the reunified Germany to make such a demand, commented the Guardian.

Merkel was uncompromising, while appearing uncomfortable and irritated. “In the view of the German government, the issue of reparations is politically and legally closed,” she said.

0,,18220773_401,00 Tsipras did react well by defending Merkel when the Nazi issue came up —

saying that Spiegel’s front-cover showing Merkel among the Nazis in Athens was “extremely unfair to the chancellor, and to Germany”.

CAyzJdVU8AAuH09Greek PM added,

“I shouted when I saw [Nazi] cartoon in my own party newspaper.”  “History shouldn’t be joked about.”

Alexis Tsipras and Angela Merkel hold press conference after debt talks – as it happened, by Guardian

intelNews.org

Expert news and commentary on intelligence, espionage, spies and spying

It's All Greek

Greek art | Greek jewellery | Inspiring Gifts since 2000

Homeschooling Noel

The World Is My Classroom

Greek National Pride

έγκυρη, αμερόληπτη ενημέρωση

Covert Geopolitics

Beyond the Smoke & Mirrors

UniversalDoctor Blog

Healthcare Communication Blog / Blog de Comunicación en la Salud

%d bloggers like this: