Doing more only to do less – do we glorify busy?

Campari and Sofa

Stop the glorification of busy.My friend Gavin was telling me about a conversation he had with some Dutch colleagues. Gavin, and his compadre Georgina, find that the sheer volume of work they are confronted with on a weekly basis is just un-doable within the confines of a normal 8-hour work day. So they regularly put in 10-hour days at the office. And another couple of hours at home picking up emails. This causes all sorts of problems: they’re tired all the time, their spouses feel ignored, they don’t want to go out at night or over the weekend and they lose touch with friends.

Hmmfff…”, said their pals, “In Holland, if you were to work like that we would think you were not coping.”

“Am I”, he wondered, “not coping? Or am I doing more than I should? And if I am doing more than I should –  what should I stop doing? And…

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Are You Taking Massive Action or Passive Action?

Live to Write - Write to Live

My friend and mentor, Brooke Castillo, has often spoken about taking “massive action.” Her definition of massive action is taking action until you get the results you want.

Well, as a part-time writer with many projects in the works, I feel like I don’t see results very often—but I realize that depends on what results I’m looking for.

If the result I’m looking for is to finish my novel, I’m definitely not there yet. But if my result is to write for 15 minutes every day, then I’m seeing the result I want.

Even though 15 minutes a day (my minimum) doesn’t seem like much, it keeps the momentum going and I often write for much more than that. I’ve noticed if I start skipping days the days can turn into weeks very quickly.

So writing for at least 15 minutes a day is “massive action” for me right now.

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“If this is a deterioration in my brain, then more, please.”

The Daily Post

Blogging hasn’t been around for that long, historically speaking, but it’s already transformed the way writers seek and find their audience and become members of larger communities.

Here’s Andrew Sullivan, one of the blogosphere’s earliest — and most successful — citizens, weighing in (back in 2010) on writing, interaction, and striking a balance between different modes of expression:

I’m a writer by profession and it’s totally clear to me that since I started blogging, the amount I write has increased exponentially, my daily interactions with the views of others have never been so frequent, the diversity of voices I engage with is far higher than in the pre-Internet age — and all this has helped me become more modest as a thinker, more open to error, less fixated on what I do know, and more respectful of what I don’t. If this is a deterioration in my brain, then…

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